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dejagnu:bump to 1.6.1

github/OpenIndiana/oi-userland - Wed, 06/06/2018 - 08:24
dejagnu:bump to 1.6.1
Categories: oi-userland

xscreensaver: remove broken hacks

github/OpenIndiana/oi-userland - Wed, 06/06/2018 - 08:23
xscreensaver: remove broken hacks Added those hacks in 5.39 bump but they segfault and were not distributed before.
Categories: oi-userland

xscreensaver 5.39

github/OpenIndiana/oi-userland - Wed, 06/06/2018 - 08:06
xscreensaver 5.39 * Making it 64-bit-only * added couple of build dependencies not found autumatically as `usr/lib/xscreensaver/hacks/` are likely not checked for binary `so` requirements * Runtested: screen blank, screen poweroff, password login, various timeouts. * https://www.illumos.org/issues/9581 still applies.
Categories: oi-userland

firefox: prevent use of optimizations that uncover undefined behaviou…

github/OpenIndiana/oi-userland - Wed, 06/06/2018 - 00:43
firefox: prevent use of optimizations that uncover undefined behaviours on recent gcc
Categories: oi-userland

firefox: set optimization level for newer gcc

github/OpenIndiana/oi-userland - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 17:26
firefox: set optimization level for newer gcc
Categories: oi-userland

2018-06-05

Josef Sipek - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 17:17

Smart Clock: A New Time — Using three inexpensive wrist watches to achieve 1 second accuracy over an extended period of time.

Repairing the card reader for a 1960s mainframe: cams, relays and a clutch

The 555 Timer IC an Interview with Hans Camenzind—The Designer of the Most Successful Integrated Circuit Ever Developed

High-level Problems with Git and How to Fix Them — A Mercurial developer’s view of Git’s shortcomings.

Mailing lists vs Github

GDL 90 Data Interface Specification — Definition of the serial protocol used by  UAT receivers to feed the received data to  MFDs.

GDL 90 Extended SpecificationForeFlight’s extension to GDL 90.

Categories: illumos

2018-06-05

Josef Sipek - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 17:17

Smart Clock: A New Time — Using three inexpensive wrist watches to achieve 1 second accuracy over an extended period of time.

Repairing the card reader for a 1960s mainframe: cams, relays and a clutch

The 555 Timer IC an Interview with Hans Camenzind—The Designer of the Most Successful Integrated Circuit Ever Developed

High-level Problems with Git and How to Fix Them — A Mercurial developer’s view of Git’s shortcomings.

Mailing lists vs Github

GDL 90 Data Interface Specification — Definition of the serial protocol used by  UAT receivers to feed the received data to  MFDs.

GDL 90 Extended SpecificationForeFlight’s extension to GDL 90.

Categories: illumos

Altering the deal... again....

/dev/dump - Garrett D'Amore - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 05:56
(No, this is not about GitHub or Microsoft... lol.)

Back in March (just a few months ago), I signed up on Leanpub to publish the NNG Reference Manual.  I was completely in the dark about how to go about self-publishing a book, and a community member pointed me at Leanpub.

Leanpub charged $99 to set up, back in March, and offered a 90% (minus 50 cents) royalty rate.  On top of it they let me choose a price from free, or $0.99 to $99.  Buyers could choose within that range.  This looked great, although I was a bit hesitant to spend the $99 since there was no way to try their platform out.

Note that at this time I was not interested (and am still not interested) in their authoring tools based on Markua.  I had excellent tooling already in Asciidoctor, plus a bunch of home-grown tools (that I've since further expanded upon) to markup and layout the book, plus previewing, etc.

Everything was great, and I made sales ranging from $0.99 to $20.  Not a lot of sales, but enough to nearly recoup my $99 investment.  Now, I wasn't looking at this as a money making venture, but as a way to help support my work around NNG -- having a professionally produced reference manual was something I considered an important step for NNG.

Shortly after I created the book and published, Leanpub changed the minimum price that buyers could pay to $4.99.  We're talking about a digital good here.  First time the deal was altered....

Then in April, they introduced a new SaaS pricing model, where I could have ditched the $99 fee.  So I'm feeling like a chump, but hey at least I have that 90% royalty rate, right?  (By this time I'd sold enough to cover that initial $99 outlay, thanks to generous supporters from the NNG community.) . Deal altered again.

Then they introduced a freemium model in May, where I really could have skipped that $99 outlay.  But they told me that I was grandfathered, so I could keep my 90% rate, so I was getting something for that $99 I spent originally.  Deal altered third time?

Now, they've told me that they've changed their mind, and no, they aren't going to let me keep that grandfathered rate.  Deal altered again?!?

They posted a long essay explaining why they "had" to do this.  I get it, their old business model wasn't working.  But in the past 3 months they've made not one, not two, but three changes to their pricing and business model.  They've made promises, and gone back on their word.

But it's ok, because at 80% I'm making more than with Amazon, right?  Well, no, not really.  I won't repeat the calculations here, but it turns out that I would have made slightly more money with Amazon.  Now, that's partly due to the fact that my sales have been quite slow (as they were predicted to be -- this is a really niche book -- a reference manual for a product that isn't even 1.0 yet.)

The thing is, I'm slightly irked about the loss of income, but I'm much more angry about the lack of respect they've given us, their authors and customers.  Clearly, their promises don't carry much weight.  They've offered lifetime free Pro accounts to customers who were with them long enough to have at least $500 in royalties, but everyone else is out of luck.  As to those lifetime pro accounts -- well, it's "lifetime, or until we change our mind".   Which seems to occur about once a month.

Now Leanpub isn't some big bad company, but their attitude and thinking reflected in how they've handled this process shows clear alignment with the same thought processes that those big bad companies have.  As an author you're not a valued partner to them -- you're a source of revenue, with very little effort on their part required to support you.

I've started rethinking my use of Leanpub obviously.

It seems like I can make use of Selz which seems to have really good support for selling digital goods like eBooks (and even has a Pay What You Want option!), and with my small number of digital goods will only charge me the transaction processing costs -- either 2.9% or 3.9% depending on location.  (Digital goods are not taxable in California.)  So what was I gaining from Leanpub again?

For Kindle and iBooks, it also looks like dealing with Amazon and Apple directly look like a better deal than Leanpub.  You get their expanded distribution, and yes, you only get 70% royalties, but you don't have to pay any recurring fees.  Unless you're doing large volumes, the math on these works out better than any of the Leanpub paid plans.

 (IngramSpark, where I have also posted the book, also works, but I've had less than satisfactory results with their epub->mobi conversion, so I can't recommend using them for Kindle at least, and I think the royalties you get from dealing directly with Apple are superior anyway.)

This all seems like a lot of work, but I hope this helps other authors who might be considering using Leanpub.

(There is one feature which is nice on Leanpub, which is the ability to publish an incomplete work in progress, and then keep updating it.  But let's face it, you can do that equally well from your own website and something like Selz.)

Categories: Personal Blogs

Not Abandoning GitHub *yet*

/dev/dump - Garrett D'Amore - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 00:46
The developer crowds are swarming off of GitHub in the wake of today's announcement that Microsoft has agreed to purchase GH for $7.5B.
I've already written why I think this acquisition is good for neither GitHub nor Microsoft.  I don't think it's good for anyone else either... but maybe at least it alerts us all to the dangers of having all our eggs in the same basket.
At the moment my repositories will not be moving.  The reason for this is quite simple -- while the masses race off of GitHub, desperate for another safe harbor, the panic that this has created is overwhelming alternative providers.  GitLab reported a 10X growth.  While this might be good for GitLab, its not good for people already on GitLab, as there was already quite a well understand performance concern around GitLab.com.
At least in the short term, GitHub's load will decrease (at least once all the code repo exports are done), I think. 
The other thing is that Microsoft has come out and made some pretty strong promises about not altering the GitHub premise, and the "new leadership" over there is ostensibly quite different from the old.  (Having said that, there is a lot of bad blood and history between FOSS and Microsoft. A lot of the current generation of millenials don't have that history, but some of us haven't forgotten when Steve Ballmer famously said "Linux is a cancer", and when Microsoft used every dirty trick in the book to try to kill all competitors, including open source software.  If Microsoft had had its way back in the 90s and 00s, the Internet would have been a company shanty-town, and Linus Torvalds would have been a refugee outlaw.
Thankfully that didn't happen.
Microsoft is trying to clean its image up, and maybe it is reformed now, but the thing we all have to remember is that Microsoft is beholden first, foremost, and exclusively to it's shareholders.  Rehabiliting it's image is critical to business success today, but at it's roots Microsoft still has those same obligations.)
The past couple of years of good behavior doesn't undo decades of rottenness; many of us would have been thrilled to see Microsoft enter chapter 11 as the just dessert for its prior actions.
Microsoft was losing mindshare to OSS and software like Git (and companies like GitHub). Purchasing GitHub is clearly an effort to become relevant again.   The real proof will be seen if Microsoft and GitHub are still as FOSS friendly in two years as they are today.  Promises made today are cheap.
But I'm willing to let them have the benefit of the doubt, understanding that I retain my options to depart at any time.  I won't be creating *new* repositories there, and my private one's will be moving off of GitHub because I don't want Microsoft to have access to my proprietary work.  (Probably they can still get it from backups at GitHub, but we do what we can...)
But my open source stuff is still there.  For now.
That means mangos, NNG, nanomsg, and tcell remain.  For now.
It's up to Microsoft and GitHub to see if they stay.
 - Garrett
Categories: Personal Blogs

inkscape: bump to 0.92.3

github/OpenIndiana/oi-userland - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 00:11
inkscape: bump to 0.92.3
Categories: oi-userland

cmake: bump to 3.11.3

github/OpenIndiana/oi-userland - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 00:05
cmake: bump to 3.11.3
Categories: oi-userland

shared-macros.mk: missing gcc compiler flags for C++ and FORTRAN

github/OpenIndiana/oi-userland - Tue, 06/05/2018 - 00:05
shared-macros.mk: missing gcc compiler flags for C++ and FORTRAN
Categories: oi-userland

webkitgtk: fixup compiled path for libexec executables

github/OpenIndiana/oi-userland - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 19:25
webkitgtk: fixup compiled path for libexec executables
Categories: oi-userland

LightDM 1.26.0

github/OpenIndiana/oi-userland - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 17:52
LightDM 1.26.0 LightDM bump to the latest release. Regenerated patches. Added commented out paths to `accountsservice`, we may use it some day. Tested: title widgets, login, restart, shutdown. Suspend does not work (but it's not a regression for me), it just puts LightDM SMF to maintenance. New feature: In case of joined displays, the login prompt follows pointer to activated screen. Bug fixed: When screen turned off in LightDM it was stuck for me and I was not able to unlock it. Not anymore.
Categories: oi-userland

hicolor-icon-theme 0.17

github/OpenIndiana/oi-userland - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 13:32
hicolor-icon-theme 0.17
Categories: oi-userland

jq: bump to 1.5 and fix CVE-2015-8863, CVE-2016-4074

github/OpenIndiana/oi-userland - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 13:31
jq: bump to 1.5 and fix CVE-2015-8863, CVE-2016-4074
Categories: oi-userland

libvorbis: CVE-2017-14160, CVE-2018-10392 (solaris-userland)

github/OpenIndiana/oi-userland - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 13:30
libvorbis: CVE-2017-14160, CVE-2018-10392 (solaris-userland)
Categories: oi-userland

taglib: CVE-2017-12678 (solaris-userland)

github/OpenIndiana/oi-userland - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 13:30
taglib: CVE-2017-12678 (solaris-userland)
Categories: oi-userland

libexif: CVE-2017-7544 (solaris-userland)

github/OpenIndiana/oi-userland - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 13:30
libexif: CVE-2017-7544 (solaris-userland)
Categories: oi-userland

libtiff: CVE-2017-17095, CVE-2017-18013, CVE-2018-8905 (solaris-userl…

github/OpenIndiana/oi-userland - Mon, 06/04/2018 - 13:30
libtiff: CVE-2017-17095, CVE-2017-18013, CVE-2018-8905 (solaris-userland)
Categories: oi-userland

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